Beef Cutlets

Beef Cutlets
1 1/2 pounds trimmed beef (approx.)*
1 tablespoon oil
Season of choice, garlic powder, salt/pepper, grill spices,
1 tablespoon butter
1 can (15 oz) broth (chicken, beef, vegetable)


Thinly slice meat across the grain (chilling or partially freezing meat will help make thin even slices). Place meat slices between two pieces of plastic wrap and pound with a mallet until meat is flattened double in circumference. Use the flat side of the mallet to avoid tearing holes in the meat.

Heat oil in large skillet over medium/high heat; add thin slices of pounded meat and quickly cook (approximately 1-2 minutes per side); season to taste. Remove meat to serving platter and cover to keep warm.

Add butter to drippings in pan, heat over medium heat. Add broth, stir to dissolve glaze from the bottom of the skillet. Bring to a boil and cook until reduced by half; season to taste. If desired, broth may be thicken slightly be adding 2-3 teaspoons cornstarch to 1/4 cup water and stirring into boiling broth once reduced. To serve, spoon broth over warm meat; serve with vegetables, whole grain roll, glass of milk, and fruit for dessert for balanced nutrition.

* Recipe works well with beef, pork, chicken, or lamb.

Edible portion of cooked meat per pound varies according the amount of bone, fat and gristle in the meat. Below is a quick guide to compare cuts and prices of meat for approximately 3 oz trimmed cooked serving. To calculate the edible cost of meat per pound, divide the cost per pound by the figure to the right.

1. Consider less tender cuts – once trimmed of fat and gristle and cooked, pound per pound you will have the same nutrition (see chart)





Cut
of Meat

Average
3 oz
Serving

per
Pound Cooked

Average
Cost

per
Edible Pound

Boneless
(ground meat, chops, loin, tenderloin)
3-4
per pound
3.5
Some
Bone and/or Fat (roasts)
2-3
per pound
2.5
Very
Boney and/or fatty
1-1/2
per pound
1.5



Example Comparison:





Raw
Price Per Pound

=
Cooked Price Per Serving

Rump
Roast (some fat, gristle)

$
3.99/lb
$1.60
Tenderloin
(boneless, little waste)
$
6.99/lb

$1.99

Tenderloin
(boneless, little waste)

$
4.99/lb
$1.42



In this example – Rump roast would be cheaper if tenderloin cost 6.99/lb, but when the cost of tenderloin drops to 4.99 it becomes the less pricey choice of meat.

2. Tenderize – thin cuts of meat – pounding is a great meat tenderizer (show)

3. Serving size – avoid the temptation to get caught up in the bigger is better, all you can eat, portion distortion. A 3 oz of meat is considered a serving. So “expand your vision” Pounding meat increases it’s diameter making it appear as a larger serving

For delicious dairy recipes and information go to www.UtahDairyCouncil.com

Add comment