Studio 5 is live! Click here to watch.

Click It and Pitch It

Creating a Photographic Memory

Marsha Whitt-Brown is with Archiver’s and shows how the items are not only visually recorded and the memories preserved, but you get the added benefit of getting rid of all that clutter!

________________________________________________________________________


• We all have memories from our childhood, a special family member, or an important event, that we want to record.

• Many of us have boxes and boxes of old art projects, trophies, or knick knacks that we know we’ll never use again but aren’t sure what to do with.

• Often times, the actual item isn’t what is important—it’s the memory or story behind the item that we want to keep and remember for years to come.

• Photographing these items allows us to visually record them, while getting rid of the clutter and moving on.

• As we get older, our memories fade, and we may not remember all the specific details behind a significant event or memento, making capturing those memories all the more important now.

• Commemorate a family member who has passed away by photographing their favorite things and writing down your memories about that person.

• Connect younger generations with deceased family members through photographs and journaling—it gives children a chance to know their grandparents, or great-grandparents, for example.

• At Archiver’s, we have everything you need to get started preserving your precious memories.

• Stop in to any Archiver’s and use our digital print station or archival copier for easy, fast photo printing and copying.

• It’s important to use acid-free and lignin-free products so your pages don’t fade and yellow over time.

Projects:

1. Remembering Mom Scrapbook

• 12×12 albums are perfect for including several photos on each page, which is ideal if you are talking about a grouping of items.

• Or, if you want to focus on individual items, 8×8 scrapbooks would be a great solution.

• Scan Mom’s handwritten notes and include them in the page.

2. Junior’s Art Album

• 4×6 pocket page albums are perfect for this type of project.

• Coordinate the panel card with the projects by using cardstock or patterned papers in matching colors.

• Letter stickers or rub-ons are an easy way to include your child’s age on the card.

3. Oversized Art Scrapbook

• 12×12 scrapbooks allow you to scale the art down, but yet still see the important details that might get lost on a smaller print.

• Backing the art with solid white or black cardstock allows the art to shine without competing with the paper behind it.

• Journaling block rubber stamps are an easy and consistent way to label each page.

4. When I Was Young Album

• For a no-fuss, no-frill way of recording your memories, a simple spiral bound scrapbook is ideal.

• It doesn’t take a lot of supplies—just some adhesive and a good journaling pen.

5. Glory Days Scrapbook

• Make sure to get photographs of your high school logo or sports uniform, CDs you own, or popular fashion trends—in essence, create a mini time capsule on your page!

• Incorporate a little flair by using rubber stamps, letter stickers, and rub-ons.

• Use a square punch to make all photos uniform.

• If you’re focusing on high school sports, there are many patterned papers and embellishments you can include on the pages too.

6. Blast from the Past Frame

• Customize the color cardstock you choose to the photograph or your home décor.

• Rubber stamps, rub-ons, or letter stickers can add variety to the words surrounding the photo.

• Jazz up the title with some ribbon or raffia for extra texture.

Memories are so special because they serve as a link to the past. It is so important to preserve them, not only for yourself, but for future generations as well. Take photos and get the stories down on paper, whether it’s through a scrapbook, photo album, or framed décor item. Remember, you don’t always need to hold on to the physical item—the trophy, the finger painting, or the knick knack—to hold on to the memory!

Creating a Photographic Memory

Marsha Whitt-Brown is with Archiver’s and shows how the items are not only visually recorded and the memories preserved, but you get the added benefit of getting rid of all that clutter!

_____________________________________________

For more information, you can visit Archiver’s in the University Mall or online at www.archiversonline.com.

Add comment