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Zero Fatalities: Winter Driving

Sgt. Jeff Nigbur with the Utah Highway Patrol talks about what you need to know.


Before you go…

1. Check road and weather conditions. If the weather is bad, consider not driving until weather conditions improve.

2. Before you go, clear the snow. Take the time to clear the snow and ice off the entire car, including headlights, brake lights, blinkers and license plates.


• Clear the snow and ice off all glass surfaces of your car to ensure good visibility.

• Snow on top of your car can slide off and cover your windshield while driving, blocking your visibility. Snow and ice can also fly off your car, endangering other drivers.

3. Make sure that your windshield wipers are in good working order and wiper fluid is full

4. Buckle Up! Make sure all passengers are buckled in properly. National studies estimate that 50 percent of motor vehicle fatalities would have survived if they had buckled up.

While driving…

1. Slow Down. In hazardous conditions, drive below the posted speed limit.

• Take it slow when approaching intersections, off-ramps, bridges or shady areas; all are hot spots for black ice.

2. Allow additional space between cars.

• Under normal road conditions, allow at least a two-second gap between you and the car in front of you. However, when road conditions are wet, snowy or icy, allow additional time.

WINTER DRIVING SAFETY TIPS:

• Check road conditions, and if the weather is bad, consider not driving until weather conditions improve.

• Plan ahead. If you need to be somewhere, leave early, give yourself plenty of time to arrive alive.

• Clear the snow and ice off all glass surfaces of your car to ensure that your visibility is good.

• Clear the snow and ice off the entire car. Snow can slide off your roof and cover your windshield while driving giving you absolutely no visibility. Snow and ice can also fly off your car, endangering you and other drivers.

• Make sure all passengers are buckled in properly. National studies estimate that 50 percent of motor vehicle fatalities would have survived if they had buckled up.
• Slow down in wet, snowy and icy conditions. In Utah, speeding is a factor in 25 percent of all fatalities.

• Accelerate slowly. Punching the gas on wet or snowy roads can cause you to lose control of your vehicle.

• Turn off cruise control in hazardous conditions. YOU need to be in control of your car.

• Under normal road conditions, allow at least a two-second gap between you and the car in front of you. However, when road conditions are wet, snowy or icy, allow additional time.

• If you feel like you are losing traction, slow down and don’t slam on the brakes.


More information regarding Zero Fatalities can be found by visiting: www.zerofatalities.com

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